• Acute and chronic wound healing, burns, topical treatments, local delivery.
  • Evaluation of safety and efficacy of dermal drugs, devices and dressings.
  • Wound healing (chronic and acute)
  • Burns
  • Topical treatments
  • Translational large animal disease models (pig) for acute and chronic wound healing and burns.

Desease Models

Pig Model of Acute Wound Healing

The acute excisional wounds can be superficial, partial-thickness, or full-thickness.

Superficial wounds are made by repeated tape stripping, which removes only the stratum corneum and stratum granulosum. These wounds are excellent models to study the absorption of pharmaceutical and bandaging interventions and their effect on epidermal regeneration.

 Partial-thickness wounds are made by removal of the epidermis and variable amounts of dermis,

but usually leave the bases of the sebaceous glands and hair follicles intact. These excisions are frequently made with a dermatome;

Full-thickness wounds are made with a punch biopsy or scalpel by removal of the entire dermis down to the subcutaneous tissue or fascia; these wounds are optimal for inducing and studying hypertrophic scarring.

Pig skin has been shown to be the most similar to human skin structurally and biochemically.

Pigs are especially useful in wound healing and burn lesions studies due to the re-revitalization healing (as human) rather than by contraction (as rodent). Another advantage is the ability to use multiple wounds on the same animal which provides the ability to have the same animal serve as its own control and also to have different treatment on the same animal

Pig Model of Chronic Wound Healing

A full thickness wound 1.5cm x 1.5cm is incised and excised on both sides of the spine. Following excisions, doxorubicin is injected to the peripheral edges of the wounds. After few days, doxorubicin is reinjected to the peripheral edges of the wounds. From day 8 forwarded the wounds are checked daily for evaluation of the eschar formation on the wound. Treatment begin after all wounds developed eschar.

Pig skin has been shown to be the most similar to human skin structurally and biochemically.

Pigs are especially useful in wound healing and burn lesions studies due to the re-revitalization healing (as human) rather than by contraction (as rodent). Another advantage is the ability to use multiple wounds on the same animal which provides the ability to have the same animal serve as its own control and also to have different treatment on the same animal.

This model was used by companies to estimate the dose and treatment duration for maximal efficacy of eschar removal in chronic wounds.

Pig Model of Burns Using Radiant Heat

A 5 by 5 cm burns (deep partial thickness at the central and more superficial, partial thickness at the periphery) are created using a radiant healing device symmetrically on both sides of the pig adjacent to the vertebral spine. Immediately after burn infliction the burned epidermal layer consisting of keratin (which is equivalent to the “blisters” that normally form in humans) is gently wiped with soaked with saline saturated gauze.

The most accepted animal model for studying the healing of burns is the pig, due to the resemblance of its skin to that of humans. An advantage of this model is that the heating source does not come into direct contact with the animal, and the heat dispersion surrounding its center is relatively consistent in depth, size and location, therefore the effect of manipulation and burn treatment on wound healing outcome can easily accomplished. The model has been used by companies for the development of the enzymatic debridement agents.

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